Mechanics

Snucking Threw the Poring Reign (Part 2)

by John Robert Marlow
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Snucking Threw the Poring Reign: Mechanical Errors in Writing (Part Two)
by John Robert Marlow

As mentioned in Part One, writing mechanics are dull, but essential—like checking the oil and brake fluid when you’d rather be cruising down the coast. You can’t do one without keeping an eye on the other. So let’s take a look at another batch of common mechanical errors…

Snucking Threw the Poring Reign (Part One)

by John Robert Marlow
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Snucking Threw the Poring Reign: Mechanical Errors in Writing (Part One)
by John Robert Marlow

“Mechanical errors” have to do with the nuts and bolts of writing. If concept is your flashy car, plot the engine, characters the driver and passengers—then story mechanics are the fasteners holding your engine together. They’re not exciting, glitzy, or personable, and no one pays them any mind. Until something goes wrong.

Repeat Offenders

by John Robert Marlow
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Repeat Offenders: Why Repetition is Bad Bad Bad
by John Robert Marlow

PETE & REPETE

There’s an old joke that goes like this:

“Pete and Repete sat on a fence. Pete fell off. Who was left?”

“Repete”

“Pete and Repete sat on a fence. Pete fell off. Who was left…?”

The joke continues until the guy answering the question wises up. Too many budding authors never do.